Human Powered Batteries

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Planet Innovation, a technology development company, has recently undertaken a research project with an AMSI Intern in the area of energy harvesting technology for electronic devices.

The company is developing a family of wireless electronic devices for health, fitness and biomedical applications. A key challenge with such devices is that batteries need to be replaced regularly, which can be problematic.

AMSI Intern, Saiful Islam from Deakin University, worked with Planet Innovation to optimise the design of their new products by developing an energy harvesting system to further extend the life of the battery.

“We’re using the movement of the human body as an energy source to recharge the battery,” Saiful said.

“Up until now, charging or replacing batteries for mobile devices has been accepted as a necessary inconvenience, but energy harvesting technology can dramatically reduce this, potentially removing the need altogether.

“The AMSI intern program has helped to develop energy harvesting technology which might find its way into new products someday,” said Michael Joffe, Innovation Manager.

AMSI Intern provides an affordable avenue for Australian businesses to access the vast research expertise in Australian universities. The interns are postgraduate university students and receive support from an academic mentor at their university, providing businesses with additional specialist knowledge.

Importantly, the program is designed to ensure all intellectual property remains with the business. Projects are typically four to five months duration, with some businesses offering long-term employment to the intern following the conclusion of the project.

Intern: Saiful Islam, Deakin University
Academic Mentors: Associate Prof. Abbas Kouzani and Associate Prof. Yong Xiang
Industry Partner: Stuart Elliot, Managing Director, Planet Innovation